Life Learner

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A life learner is someone who focuses not on the end game, but rather on the process of continually refining their idea of the bigger picture. This continual refinement of the bigger picture is intimately connected with the continual refinement of one’s own skills.

In order for wisdom to be accumulated, it is vital that a person improve a little bit every day so that, over time, there is a steady pattern of growth. Over the course of this process of incremental growth, the bigger picture also has to change incrementally and be refined in keeping with the insights one has gained along the way. Personal growth leads to personal change, and consequently the lens through which one views reality must be refined to suit this change. As a result, the life learner is always refining his focus area and changing their views on the world as they understand it.  Life learners therefore gain a deeper understanding of reality than those who are shortsighted, and this gives them considerable insight into many fields.   

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Preparation Through Groundwork

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Preparation is the key to success with horses, and it all starts with groundwork.  If you’re not properly prepared to handle the spontaneity of unexpected events, the answer can almost always be found on the ground.  Instead of working with your horse from a place of fear, try a little confidence and trust.  Start by preparing your horse for the real world, not the finite world of perfectly controlled atmospheres.  This means that yes, there will have to be a little hard work and consistent practice until you start to resolve the issues at hand.  The key is working from a perspective that horses can understand, not from a mindset of perfection or complete unawareness.

If a proper foundation of groundwork has been established, in moments of need your horse will not only take care of itself, but you as well.  They’ll start to look to you for support and guidance, instead of seeing you as a mechanism of torture and meaningless work.  If you are able to connect with the horse from its feet to its mind and vice versa, soon what might have been terror or boredom turns into a curious confidence.  If you give meaning to what you are doing, it gives the horse a sense of relaxation through purpose. The horse starts to look to you for the next objective instead of always trying to find something else to occupy its mind or interrupt the training.

What people don’t realize is how connected groundwork and saddlework actually are.  Groundwork provides the tools necessary to support a confused, scared, or threatened horse in a safe environment.  If the groundwork is properly done, it gives you everything you will need in the saddle to refine basic movements, bypassing any emotional and physical discomfort on the part of the horse.

Always remember that your horse would rather be out in a huge pasture with many other horses, so give the horse a reason to want to go to work with you.  If the horse is in a stall and only occasionally turned out in a small pasture, you may be the only thing that gives it purpose and peace. Alternatively, you could be the other side of the spectrum to the horse too. You could be the worst part of its day.  Which person do you want to be to your horse?  One who gives it purpose, meaning, and peace, or one whom the horse looks at as a hostile interrogator about to demand another session of “give me what I want or else”.

Prepare your horse instead of controlling it.  Give it a chance to search, explore, and even make mistakes without punishment, only support and guidance.  Allow it to find the correct answers through searching and thinking on its own terms.

The Instagram Effect

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Something I have noticed over the past few years is people saying how perfect someone’s life must be based on their social media page, social status, or profession. All that those people see is the glamorous image that is in front of them at that moment; they never stop to see the whole picture and recognize the long process that brought the person they envy to their current point in life. I call this the Instagram effect.

Those who rely solely on social media’s edited and filtered images to make judgments about the quality of another person’s life are missing the reality of the situation entirely. I have witnessed this time and time again in my own life. A lot of people see my Instagram pictures and think I am just living the dream – and don’t get me wrong, I am living my dream – but they don’t see the other side of my life which is struggling to find my niche away from everything and everyone I know and travelling coast to coast in a truck and trailer by myself for long stretches of time. There are countless days when I would give anything to be back with my family and friends working a 9 to 5 job with a sense of security. Instead, I am always trying to make ends meet as I further my education, moving continually so that I can pursue a life of learning and serving others with the knowledge I am slowly gathering. Of course, I do get lonely and become exhausted, but tomorrow is always a new fresh day to start all over again.

The images that I post on Instagram are invariably the most beautiful and idealistic moments of my life, and this is all that those who follow me on social media see. The reality is that these images are edited to look perfect, and no one’s life (including mine) is actually true to their Instagram photos. If someone were to post honest photos of their day-to-day life, nobody would want to see it. Nobody wants to see and hear about normal every day processes or, even worse, the downsides to certain bad days.  Everyone wants to pretend that if they were that person with the glamorous Instagram everything would be easier and perfect. All their problems would go away. The sad truth is that if they saw the whole picture, they would probably think twice.

I see this same phenomenon with horses all the time. Someone sees a horse they love, they buy it, and within a month or so the incredible horse has seemingly deteriorated into a normal horse.  As George Morris always says with a great smirk, “You can’t buy this,” referring to what he has earned through hard work with horses over a lifetime. Buck offers similar wisdom when he says that “you will need to bleed” in order to understand horses and achieve refinement with them.  You can’t buy a horse and expect it to stay great unless your abilities match or exceed the education level of the previous rider.

No matter how much the “journey” is emphasized as important, however, most people don’t want to go through the hardships in order to reap the benefits. Most people want good results handed to them.  But what would your life look like without the hardships, moments of self-discovery, and the failures that ultimately lead to new wisdom? What if everything was just handed to you and life was just success after success without any effort?  Wouldn’t it be a life full of selfishness and complete meaninglessness? In my experience, the best part of the journey is going through what it takes to progress forward: striving to live a life of meaning by serving others with your special talents and passions. Without the struggle, there is no incentive to continue living life with vigor and a sense of urgency to learn.  I don’t think that I have much to offer now compared to what I will be able to offer in ten or more years, but this is what keeps me going every day.

Don’t get caught up wanting to be someone else because their life looks perfect. Let go of that illusion, and start to do what you can in reality.  Find a way to live a meaningful life by serving others through studying, applying, and reflecting every day.  Nothing is going to happen overnight, and the only way to succeed is by accumulating knowledge over a long period of time.  I wish I had some great success story to tell you about how this process has led me to achieve great things, but I am merely another person trying to survive the journey and learn from the struggle. I have faith that the process will take me where I am meant to go whenever I am meant to go there.

Audio Intake

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Audio intake is a great way to learn and continually expand on thoughts you may have been having.  Listening to audio books or podcasts are a great way to utilize time spent in a car, plane, or any situation in which you may be mindlessly absent otherwise.  The best part to me as a frequent traveler of the road, is how fast it makes a trip go by, engaging your mind in a whole different way.  For me, it really helps me reflect on the past, create new ideas for the future, and refine my thoughts with further understanding of reality.
There is subject matter for all interests in either podcast or audio book form, be sure to find time to listen daily to further enrich your mind.  Don’t get me wrong I love some music here and there, but if its over a 15 minute trip you can bet I will be listening to some podcast or audio book.  Whether it’s fiction or non fictional doesn’t matter, use the time to engage your brain on a different level.
Find dead spots through out your days that you could be capitalizing on to start to listen to some form of audio intake.  Whether that may be when you wake up, in your car, at work, before bed, during a walk, and when ever else it may be appropriate.  Spark your mind with positively enriching audio to create new ideas, reflect on old experiences, and refine thoughts that continually develop through out your life.
Audio is priceless for the stories, studies, insights, and breadth that help me to better convey my words to fit the understanding of others through their eyes.
Vast, quality intake is the key!  By combining hearing, seeing, feeling, reading, writing, teaching, reflecting, and refining; the odds of really retaining and further understanding increase.  Ultimately helping me to better understand reality and the need for simplicity.